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If you want to be in the know about what’s going on at our organization, you’ve come to the right place.

Be sure to check back regularly to get our latest news updates.

The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 faces rising numbers of legal challenges and a critical courtroom loss.

Culturally responsive services are vital to our existence, preservation of our heritage, tribal identity and the strengthening of our families.

A bill that would breathe new life into food sovereignty efforts and expand agricultural and economic development opportunities in Indian Country is almost across the finish line

Policies adopted during more paternalistic eras of federal Indian policy are finally coming to an end.

President Trump said he will own a government shutdown in a theatrical meeting with Democratic leaders.

After months of meetings, progress toward a multistate drought contingency plan has been a two-steps-forward, one-step-back affair.

Both sides in the battle over Indian health care in Rapid City, South Dakota, are accusing the other of spreading misinformation.

The executive director of the National Congress of American Indians remains on leave as the organization continues to experience employee turnover.

Tribal monitors are helping collect data on culturally significant sites that are facing an uncertain future in Arizona.

Federal law enforcement officials and Native women will be discussing the missing and murdered in Indian Country at a hearing in Washington, D.C.

A jury in Nebraska has cleared a fired police officer for beating a Native man who later died.

The Winnebago Tribe's economic development corporation is battling the state of Nebraska in federal court.

Someday we will all make that journey and what we give of ourselves will be what remains.

Indian energy, Indian education and Indian health are gaining a boost as the 115th Congress comes to a close.

Zachary Bear Heels, 29, died after beating by police officers but one of them doesn't think he should be held responsible.

Owning about 75 percent of Indian mass media, tribal governments are a key barrier to independent reporting in American Indian outlets, according to a new report.

We Lakota celebrate Christmas because it was an important part of our culture to give and share gifts on special occasions.

Federal prosecutors have now publicly alleged that the answer is yes, the president is a crook.

Mariah Bahe, 14 years old, is the reigning Arizona State Junior Olympics champion in boxing.

The Ahiarmiut are entitled to an acknowledgement by the Canadian government that they were victims of genocide.

The Seminole Tribe must pay utility taxes to the state of Florida, the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled for a second time.

If our language disappears, we will be without the core of the vibrant and thriving culture we share from generation to generation.

For those of us who are able to give more, this is the perfect opportunity to get involved in the community and help spread the holiday cheer this season.

Will the Washington NFL team and its racist mascot be returning to the nation's capital with the help of the Trump administration and Congress?

Native activists are celebrating after a judge blocked certain pre-construction activities on the Keystone XL Pipeline, including work on controversial man camps that are linked to crimes against Native women.

The brutal murder of Amanda Webster emphasizes the plight of Indigenous women throughout the country.

We are finding a disturbing legacy of sterilization of Indigenous women.

We are fast approaching the 128th anniversary of the Massacre at Wounded Knee.

Kade Bettelyoun, from the Pine Ridge Reservation, is the 2019 Miss Indian Rodeo.

The Violence Against Women Act remains mired in partisan politics but tribes continue to utilize the law to protect their communities.

There is a long history of looting and stealing Indian burials and important cultural and sacred patrimony.

The Washington Committee on Geographic Names will be taking action on the Jamestown S'Klallam Tribe's request to name Littleneck Beach.

Efforts are underway to restore freedom of the press to the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

The massacre at Wounded Knee haunted a descendant of the U.S. Army general who was the commander of the infamous 7th Cavalry.

Zachary Bear Heels, a 29-year-old citizen of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, died after being repeatedly shocked and punched by police officers in Omaha, Nebraska.

Some in Indian Country have questioned Sen. Elizabeth Warren's decision to go public with a DNA analysis.

Dr. Tara Sood rushed to volunteer with the Indigenous-led protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs will be confronting the 'silent crisis' of the missing and the murdered at a hearing on December 12.

Zachary Bear Heels, 29, was tasered 12 times by a police officer before he died in Omaha, Nebraska.

There are stark differences between the health of Indigenous peoples in Canada and their non-Indigenous counterparts.

The Tulsa Artist Fellowship continues to foster Native talent.

The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community continues to share its good fortune with Indian Country.

A manager at Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute had a sexual relationship with a student.

It is imperative that we revive our indigenous world view and spiritual beliefs.

The Yankton Sioux man who was the victim of a brutal attack has opened his eyes and is showing signs of improvement.

Tribes will have to move quickly to save the Indian Child Welfare Act from being invalidated across the nation.

The spending bill includes Indian Health Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Bureau of Indian Education.

Amanda Dakota Webster, a 26-year-old mother of three from the Navajo Nation, was murdered on December 1.

Reptile tracks discovered in Arizona are about 310 million years old, making them the oldest ever discovered there.

The Northern Cheyenne Tribe has to choose a new president and vice president after both officials resigned.